Daily Dispatches

Gold ETF nears doubling of assets at launch

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Data may add to dollar's doldrums

The New York Times
Sunday, January 16, 2005

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/01/16/business/yourmoney/16mark.html

The report last Wednesday that the monthly trade
deficit reached $60.3 billion in November surprised
forecasters and sent the dollar reeling against other
major currencies.

Decline in foreign investment in U.S. is greater than it appears

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From Reuters
Thursday, January 13, 2005

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=7321265

FRANKFURT -- The European Central Bank will post a 2004
budget loss for the second year in a row due to the U.S.
dollar's decline against the euro, the ECB Vice President
Lucas Papademos said on Thursday.

Thailand plans major shift of reserves from dollar to euro and Asian bonds

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By Jennifer Hughes
Financial Times
Monday, January 10, 2005

http://news.ft.com/cms/s/918f8a8c-60f0-11d9-af5a-00000e2511c8%
2Cstream%3DFTSynd%2Cs01%3D2.htmlWall

"You should always, always, keep 10 percent of your portfolio in
gold," says Frank Holmes, chief investment officer of US Global
Investors, a Texas-based group of funds.

European Central Bank''s loss caused by depreciation of dollar reserves

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Company Press Release via CCNMatthews
Thursday, January 13, 2005

http://biz.yahoo.com/ccn/050113/8a1a87e5e9b7a1bdf56762a810e742e8_1.htm
l

VANCOUVER, British Columbia -- First Silver Reserve
Inc. (FSR on the Toronto Stock Exchange) today
announced that the company has recently purchased
another 100,000 ounces of silver at a price below the

First Silver Reserve puts more of its cash into metal that can''t be leased

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Business Day, Bangkok, Thailand
Thursday, January 13, 2005

http://bday.net/detail.asp?id=61154

The government wants to cut the proportion of Thailand's
$50 billion worth of foreign reserves kept in US
dollar-denominated assets, to cut the risks associated
with the currency's roller-coaster ride on the forex
markets.

Olarn Chaiprawat, adviser to Minister of Finance Somkid

James Turk explains ''The Coming Collapse of the Dollar''

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By Simon Johnson
Reuters
Wednesday, January 12, 2005

http://www.reuters.co.uk/newsArticle.jhtml?
type=topNews&storyID=652427

STOCKHOLM -- Gold is no longer the metal of choice for the adornment
of the ruling class because "chavs" are reducing its elitist appeal.

Rappers, hip-hop artists, and youngsters copying their pop icons are

Ted Butler: Same as it ever was, only better

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By Agence France-Presse
Monday, January 10, 2005

http://news.yahoo.com/news?
tmpl=story&u=/afp/20050110/ts_afp/eueurozoneecbbankeconomyforexeurores
ults_050110125804

FRANKFURT -- The weak dollar appears to be tearing
holes in the annual accounts of central banks both in
Europe and elsewhere around the world, with many
banks considering reducing their official holdings in

Can gold survive Jessica Cross AND gangsta rappers?

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By Hans Sennholz
DailyReckoning.com
Tuesday, January 11, 2005

If the love of money is the root of all evil, the depreciation of
money must be the mainspring of all shams and frauds. It works
silently and covertly, impoverishes many while it enriches a few,
and thereby inflicts great harm on social cooperation and
international relations.

A few economists are sounding the alarm about the decline of the

Frank Holmes of US Global Investors: Each portfolio should have a heart of gold

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11:27p ET Tuesday, January 11, 2005

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

James Turk -- founder of GoldMoney, editor of the
Freemarket Gold and Money Report, and consultant
to GATA -- is just out with his book "The Coming
Collapse of the Dollar," written with his friend
John Rubino and published by Doubleday.

The book has its own Internet site --

http://www.DollarCollapse.com

Central banks count the cost of holding lots of declining dollars

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By Myra P. Saefong
CBS.MarketWatch.com
Monday, January 10, 2005

http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7B0335A88D%2D73A3%
2D4FBF%2D8DA0%2D8AD541FA8AF7%7D&siteid=mktw

SAN FRANCISCO -- Gold futures closed narrowly
higher Monday, after suffering a decline of nearly
$19 an ounce last week.

"Gold seems to be finding a small foothold here after

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